Something Smells Fishy

Because of its plethora of fresh water rivers and its location along the Caribbean coast, Suriname is home to over 350 species of freshwater fish. There are plenty of organized fishing tours to choose from (only a few are listed). If you like to eat fish but not catch them, the local supermarkets, fish markets, and restaurants also serve up a good variety.

If you love fish, be sure to taste the sweet and sour fish at Lucky Twins and other Chinese restaurants. Their Koebie fish is deep fried in a spicy batter and doused with a sweet and sour sauce. The Koebie Fish, one of Suriname’s finer delicacies, carries its own treasure rocks. Koebie stones are two little white stones that can be found inside the fish crossbones in the Kobie’s head. These stones help the fish to balance. After devouring the tasty fish, some people make it a tradition to search for the Koebie stones and polish them off. They are often jeweled with gold encasings and worn as necklace charms.

Fishing Tours
Suriname Fishing Tour 
Nature Resort Kabalebo
Sukrupatu Resort – Saramacca

Where to buy fishing accessories
Tomahawk
The Tackle Box

Some Popular Freshwater Surinamese Fish
The Brown Hoplo Catfish (Kwie Kwie) – type of hard-shelled Catfish that is often prepared with curry
The Giant Trahira (Anjumara) – a huge deep river fish that is very strong and difficult to catch
The Red-tail Catfish – a large catfish with a reddish-orange tail and a white strip across its body
Wolf Fish (Patakka)
The Peacock Bass (Tukunari) – a wild predator, great-tasting, and a very popular catch for fisherman
The Piranha (Pireng) – a bit dry on the tongue, but tastes great in soup
Cichlid Fish (Krobia)
Pencil Fish (Matoeli)

Some Sea Fish
Acoupa Weakfish (Bang Bang)
Bass Kandratiki (Kandra)

What to buy at your local fish market/supermarket
Bang Bang – often pickled and served like sushi on a sandwich, also makes a great fried fish
Koebie
Bacalou – used in moksi alesie and Her Heri dishes
Kandra
Botervis
Wit Witte

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